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How to Use the “Socratic Method” ON YOURSELF (Powerful Questions for Progress & Success)

8 December 2010 No Comment

Peace,

This one goes really in depth, so check it out:



Harmonics: “Take a Little Hand” by Gabriela Robin
(this song is HOT…play it).

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“…You’ll see this same principle in something called the ‘Socratic Method’ too – the power of posing the right questions to your subconscious mind. But what I want to do here is give you an idea of the entire process so you can form exercises and techniques like this for yourself. Check out these examples….

** What would you love to make happen with your life while you still have it?
** If you were to accomplish this thing, what’s the first change you need to make, starting now?



Do you see where I’m going? Here’s another:

** What goal would you tackle, right now, if you knew you couldn’t possibly fail?
** What would you need to have more of in your life to get there? What would you need to have less?
** What daily habits would you need to introduce to substitute others?

or:

** What has worked for you in the past when succeeding at something?
** What can you learn from your last big setback that will benefit you now?
** What are the greatest lessons you’ve learned in life so far?
** What do you keep saying to yourself that actually blocks your progress?
** What could you start saying to yourself to empower you?
** What have you been tolerating from yourself that needs to STOP?



and for good measure, here’s a few more:

** What is life asking you to do differently?
** What habits and actions could you incorporate into your life, starting today, to make this change?
** On a scale from 1 to 10, how do you feel about taking those actions?
** What could you do to raise the number on that scale?



Catch the drift? You basically ask yourself a question that pin-points the essence of the issue your dealing with, and then answer it. If the answer doesn’t motivate you and provide clarity, then question that question, question the assumption that the question relies on, or question the nature of your response. Just go on with the process repeatedly until you find an answer or a technique that makes you feel clear and more in control of the situation.



Here’s a few of my answers from that last set:

>> I need to take my morning meditations more seriously.
>> I need to create a better support structure (friends and family) to encourage me with my work.
>> From my past, I’ve learned that dedication and complete absorption into a goal, regardless of what anybody thinks about you for following it, is a prerequisite for success.



(Sit down with a pen & paper to write the answers out long hand, because physical handwriting activates a different part of your brain and attaches you to what you’re writing down on a different level.)



The bottom line is that your mind is extremely powerful, and once you make a habit of using it like this – using it to actively solve your issues – you’ll be surprised at the wisdom and ingenuity you have bottled up inside of you. Not only will you get some answers, but you’ll also get some confidence in your ability to create action strategies and plans to help you get through challenges and make the most out of life.



And another thing: don’t expect this to automatically solve whatever it is you’re going through. I’m introducing you to this as a life-skill that can help you for the rest of your life, not as a quick fix. So, the first few times you do it (if you’re like most people and you don’t have some mega motivation-giant sitting inside you), you’re going to feel good and clear at first, but after a while, you’ll fall back into your old habits and routines, so you’ll need to do it again…and again…and again.



Things are going to get muddy again and you’ll need to re-focus, that’s just the reality of it: asking yourself powerful questions is not going to create ultimate change the first time around because (guess what?) nothing creates ultimate change the first time around.



If you’re weight training or exercising, you’re not going to get buff or lean the first time you finally get yourself to go to the gym. If you’re trying to use healthier, more natural beauty products, you’re not going to look young again the first time you put the stuff on, that’s just how it is.



If you’re just learning how to cook, trust me: you’re first meal probably isn’t going to come out too tasty, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t worth the effort, and it definitely doesn’t mean you should give up.



I’ve had this website up since 2007, and look, I still don’t get hundreds of people looking at my blogposts everyday or anything like that (some websites get up to 1000 new visitors daily). What if I just said:



Maaaan…eff it. My websites not getting any traffic, so what’s the use???





You need to learn to persist and to stay dedicated to things, even when they look like they’re not working and other people tell you it doesn’t make sense (with some exception of course). This is especially true when you’re making change to an entire system – a lifetime of habits and routines, a conditioned set of beliefs or an ingrained overall structure (in the case of a relationship or an organization).



So don’t get it twisted: I still have to take time out to power question myself and reflect on things too…I have to because I’m constantly learning new things and facing bigger challenges, and I bet you’re probably doing the same in your own way.



This is why it’s important to not set too many large scale goals for yourself when you’re just starting something. When most people set out to “conquer themselves,” attain self-discipline or otherwise improve their life, they expect some revolutionary, magical shift to take place that’ll instantly improve all the different aspects of their life…just because they made a decision. It doesn’t happen & then they get discouraged and beat themselves up over it.



So don’t think like that: don’t think that just because you’ve made the decision to change that you can somehow undo years of habits, routines and conditioning. Take it easy on yourself when developing will-power and self-discipline, because if you don’t, you’re just like the dude who walks into the gym for the first time and tries to bench 400.



For research, I’ve been reading this book called Power of Will: A Practical Companion Book for the Unfoldment of Selfhood through Direct Personal Culture, written by Frank Channing Haddock in like, 1919 or something (it’s really powerful to read old scrolls like that by the way). He builds on willpower and self-discipline in-depth: how to develop it and how that development relates to the individual (or the Soul…hint, hint: it has a lot more to do with physiology – controlling your body from the inside out – then you might think). In there he says:



The giant trees of California were once puny saplings – the slow lapse of time has drawn nature into their mighty hearts…



I want you to remember that anytime you feel like you’re not progressing like you should. Remember that we live in a “quick fix” society – a culture that programs us to look for instant gratification in all things. But if you want to make changes in your life, you have to program YOURSELF to stick with things for the long term, and create a “direct personal culture” of persistence and dedication…



Here’s a few more:

** What would you like to be acknowledged for so far in your life?
** What could you give yourself more of so that you can give more to others?
** In what way are you a better person now then you were at this time last year?
** What books could you read, people could you call and talk to or websites could you visit on line to support where you’re trying to go?



Peace,
+B




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